Affordable Organic Food Springfield IL

See below to find organic food stores and other businesses that sell affordable organic food in Springfield and get access to affordable organic meal suggestions, affordable organic food recipes, and affordable organic meats, as well as advice and content on where to find affordable organic food.

Springfield Old Capital Farmers Market
(217) 544-1723
Adams Street, Between 3rd & 5th Sts.; 3 West Old Capital Plaza, Suite 15
Springfield, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-October Wednesday & Saturday, 8:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
County
Sangamon

The Lazy T
(217) 415-6846
Dawson, IL
Membership Organizations
Ecovian

Data Provided By:
Printer's Row (Chicago) Farmers Market
(312) 744-0565
Dearborn & Polk (36W - 800S) Parking lot; 47 W Polk St
Chicago, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Saturday 7:00am-2:00pm
County
Cook

First Market in Mahomet
(217) 586-1333
Main St., across from the Fire Station; P.O. Box 410
Mahomet, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
May-October Wednesday, 3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
County
Champaign

Near North (Chicago) Farmers Market
(312) 744-0565
Old Division & Dearborn Streets (1200 N-50 W); old devisions between State
Chicago, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Saturday, 7:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
County
Cook

Nexcel Natural Ingredients
(217) 391-0091
PO Box 3483
Springfield, IL

Data Provided By:
Food Fantasies
(217) 793-8009
1512 W. Wabash
Springfield, IL
 
Main Street Dekalb Farmers Market
(815) 748-7788
1 Block South of Lincoln Hwy. 1 Rt 38, Palmer Cart; 111 S. Second Street
Dekalb, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Thursday, 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
County
Dekalb

Prudential Plaza (Chicago) Farmers Market
(312) 744-0565
Prudential Building Plaza; City Hall, Room 806, 121 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : Yes
SFMNP Accepted : Yes
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Tuesday, 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
County
Cook

Ravinia Farmers Market
(847) 432-5570
Dean Ave. (Between St. John's & Roger Williams Ave; 475 Roger Williams Ave.
Highland Park, IL
General Information
Covered : No
Open Year Round : No
Programs
WIC Accepted : No
SFMNP Accepted : No
SNAP Accepted : No
Hours
June-October Wednesday, 7:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
County
Lake

Data Provided By:

Eating Organically on a Dime

Eating Organically on a Dime

Marta Graham, MS, RD, LD
Eating Organically on a Dime

I was so inspired by Dr. Gary Huber’s article, “ By the Narrowest of Margins ” and began thinking that somehow we all need to eat more proactively, but how when the economy is going down the toilet and many of us have lost jobs, investments and so on. The thought of “converting” to an organic, pesticide-free diet may seem daunting if not impossible.

Fortunately the days of poor-quality organic produce bearing a high price tag are over plus it’s not necessary to eat the organic version of each vegetable to stay in the “safe zone”. In other words, you no longer need to visit the specialty supermarket and fork out $4.00 for an organic tomato! Many conventional supermarkets–such as Kroger, in our community–now offer a superb selection of fresh organic produce at mouth-dropping prices! The other day, I bought beautiful sweet red peppers at the mere price of $1.28 each. Often, I find that most of the organic produce there is very reasonably priced and of high quality.

Farmer’s Markets & CSAs
With the economy being in a slump, another way to get more healthy fruits and vegetables and boost the local economy is to don the farmer’s markets or join a CSA group. Farmer’s markets are available in most communities in Cincinnati including in the city as well as in most suburbs. There’s usually at least one organically certified farmer at each of these markets. If you can’t find a USDA certified organic farm, chances are you will at least find a farmer who practices organic farming but may not have the resources to jump through the USDA’s hoops to get the official “USDA Organic” stamp. That’s what I found when I picked up a flyer at my hair salon the other day. A local farmer was advertising a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) group. To become a member, you pay a fee and then enjoy fresh produce from sometime in June all the way through September or October. Some CSA groups are co-ops which require you to put in a few hours of farm work during the growing season, but not all of them do. When I inquired whether the produce was organic, the farmer said that they do all they can to keep things pesticide-free and to rotate the crops to replenish the nutrients in the soil. They gave me an example of a few crops that needed some added nutrients in the soil–I believe they added the mineral boron to the broccoli fields –but other than that their produce was as organic as it could get. So for about $50 per month, we are going to enjoy a wide array of seasonal produce. The other perk this farm had was that they deliver the produce to a central location in our community about a mile from our house, so we don’t even need to travel to the farm to get it. That’s what I call customer service!

The Dirty Dozen
And back to the point I made ea...

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